India Englehardt

Foot Dilemmas Explained

Will Severs Disease Require Surgical Treatment?


Sever's disease, or calcaneal apophysitis, is a common cause of heel pain among active children between 10 to 13 years old. This spontaneous heel pain results from injury to the heel bone?s growth plate which is caused by overuse rather than specific injury or trauma. The condition is common among athletic children, particularly those active in soccer, football, and baseball. Treatment is available to reduce pain and discomfort associated with Sever's disease, but the condition usually resolves on its own once feet stop growing.


There are usually two root causes of Sever?s disease that we?ve found that effect young athletes. Arches are not supported causing a dysfunctional run, jump, and landing. The calves (gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) are overworked, tight, and do not allow proper movement of foot which puts extreme pressure on the Achilles? tendon, in turn irritating the growth plate in the heel.


The symptoms of Sever?s disease occur in the heel and the foot, and may worsen with activity. Pain and stiffness can occur in one or both heels. Symptoms can include. Swelling in the heel. Redness in the heel. Antalgic gait (such as limping). Foot pain or stiffness first thing in the morning or while walking. Pain that is worsened by squeezing the heel.


Children or adolescents who are experiencing pain and discomfort in their feet should be evaluated by a physician. In some cases, no imaging tests are needed to diagnose Sever?s disease. A podiatrist or other healthcare professional may choose to order an x-ray or imaging study, however, to ensure that there is no other cause for the pain, such as a fracture. Sever?s disease will not show any findings on an x-ray because it affects cartilage.

Non Surgical Treatment

Although most cases do get better on their own, recovery typically takes several weeks or months. Adolescents can continue to play sports if the activity does not cause discomfort, but staying active does prolong the recovery period without treatment. As a result, rest and avoidance of athletic activity is usually recommended, along with medication for pain and swelling.


Treat symptoms when they occur with RICE and NO HARM. RICE (Rest Ice, Compression and Elevation) will help following activity and when symptoms flare, while No HARM (No Heat, alcohol, running or massage) will help reduce the symptoms from occurring. Orthotics. The use of an Interpod Orthotic will assist in realigning the foot, which will reduce the stress on the Achilles Tendon and prevent reoccurring symptoms. The orthotic achieves this by reducing the forces and stress placed on the limbs during walking and running. Exercise reduction. Patients may need to reduce their level of activity if this is seen as a contributing factor. Training errors. Ensue athletes warm up and cool down correctly with stretching activities. Footwear. Sporting and school shoes should have an appropriate heel height to assist in offloading of the Achilles tendon.